Aaron Booth

How did you end up as VP, Growth?
I have spent the last 15 years working in the Toronto fintech industry. Three years ago I met Gerti, our CEO and and Co-founder, through a mutual connection. Last december he called and asked me if I wanted a challenge. I was available and here we are.

What is it about Flybits and the startup landscape that motivates you?
I really enjoy collaborating with and learning from intelligent, motivated people. I also like solving difficult problems that require a balance of thoughtfulness and risk taking – high risk, high reward! Queue startup landscape!

Share a quote/mantra that you live by.
“Do or do not, there is no try.”
Yoda

“I needed my mistakes in their order to get me here”
W. S. Merwin

What’s the secret to doing what you do?
It would be nice if there was a secret that made it all easy, but I don’t believe that to be the case. In a high growth fintech you need to embrace the people around you, roll up your sleeves, be prepared for change, and always stay focused. And most importantly, never stop learning, especially from your customers.

You have to own and want the startup struggle to enjoy the work and it can be extremely rewarding when you succeed.

Where do you see Flybits in 5 years?
Five years is a long time, particularly in the current age of uncertainty. However, we are on a clear path to creating repeatable value for customers that we can grow and scale. In five years Flybits will be a global leader in digital banking experiences, having expanded its global presence and offering multiple solutions that help our customers and partners.

How would you describe yourself?
I am an entrepreneurial, growth-oriented leader with 15+ years of B2B experience and demonstrated success in growing revenue, building and managing teams, and executing strategy. I am also a husband, father of three, son, and an avid hiker, snowboarder, and music lover. Always looking for balance!

Any final thoughts?
A wise person once said that all of life is a struggle and the key to happiness is not trying to avoid struggle, but choosing how you want to struggle. Solving problems generally makes people happy. You have to own and want the startup struggle to enjoy the work and it can be extremely rewarding when you succeed.